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How to get a Promotion in a Recession

How to…..get a promotion in a Recession
by Jane Middleton, The Middleton Partnership


Many of us are so focused on keeping our jobs that we have all but forgotten about our
ambitions for career progression in the workplace. However, as jobs are made
redundant, this may be the ideal moment to get that promotion you’ve been dreaming
of.

  • Firstly, assess the damage. Where are the gaps/vacancies in the company, and
    do you have the skills to fill them? If so, start doing the extra work. That’s an
    ideal approach because you can prove you’re good at the job before formally
    asking for the promotion.
  • In other cases, you’ll have to sell the idea to your manager/manager before
    you can take on the extra duties. Either way, how you ask for the promotion is
    key.
  • Frame your request in a way that demonstrates you want to help the company
    get through these tough times, not just take advantage of a personal opportunity.
  • Maybe you could say it like this “I know there are reductions happening, and
    fewer people will be doing more work. I’d like to be considered to help with the
    overflow. Here are the areas where I think I can contribute.”
  • Don’t be put off if the answer isn’t an immediate yes. In this difficult market
    conditions, people’s decisions often require more approval signatures than they
    used to.
  • If your boss gives you a resounding no, follow up by asking, “What can I do to
    put myself in a better position to make this happen in the future? What do you
    feel are the areas where I need to improve?” Whatever you do try to get
    concrete suggestions from them, so that you can act on them now and then
    remind them later on about the conversation later.
  • More money usually comes with a promotion, but it’s far from guaranteed these
    days. If you’ve already started taking on additional responsibilities, build your
    case by showcasing your accomplishments. If you are doing a job that three
    people used to do, point it out to the management. You’re saving the company
    thousands of pounds.
  • If that doesn’t work, you might have better luck asking for more money in the
    form of a performance-based bonus. Of course, the money/budget just may not
    be there to give you. Take the promotion anyway – it will make you far more
    marketable in and out of the company. Eventually, the economy will pull out of
    its current slump. Make sure to ask your boss when a good time might be to reevaluate your salary. Ask what hurdles the company needs to overcome before
    your salary can match your additional job responsibilities.

Get these things clearly established, so you can go back and say, “This is what you said
in the last conversation we had on this subject”.

Good luck!

To contact Jane Middleton, please email her at

jane@themiddletonpartnership.com, talk to her on 07900 250782 or find out
more information about what The Middleton Partnership can do for your
business at www.themiddletonpartnership.com

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